Memorials to United States Colored Troops, Pt. 6 – Richmond, Virginia

Memorials to United States Colored Troops

A photo-essay series dedicated to the United States Colored Troops, and how they were remembered in contemporary news media

Pt. 6

Richmond, Virginia

East End Cemetery, Evergreen Cemetery, Richmond National Cemetery

 

William I. Johnson, Sr. – East End Cemetery, Richmond, Virginia. Photo, New Journal and Guide, 1938

 

William I. Johnson, Sr.

“W. I. Johnson, Sr., Pioneer, Buried With Honors Here – Funeral services for W. I. Johnson, Sr., pioneer citizen of Richmond, a former slave who became a prominent member of one of Richmond’s most highly respected families, were held here Wednesday of this week in First African Baptist Church, with Dr. W. T. Johnson, pastor in charge. Interment was in Evergreen Cemetery.

Mr. Johnson, a reputedly self-made man, was born in Albemarle County, Virginia, February 14, 1840, and had attained the ripe age of 97, when he folded his arms in that sleep from which none ever wakes to weep.

Was pioneer Contractor

Mr. Johnson was one of the pioneers in the business world, having entered the contracting business during the dark and stormy days of reconstruction remaining active therein until a few years ago when he retired from active service because of injuries suffered in an accident.

Born and reared in slavery, Mr. Johnson saw his first experience on the battlefield as a body servant to his then “master.” Later, however, being a man of courage and initiative, he managed from the Confederate side to the Federal side when he escaped to a Yankee camp where he later served in the quartermaster corps of the Federal army. He took part in the bloody battles around Petersburg, Fort Harrison, Seven Pines, Danville and the famous battle of Manassas and was mustered out of the Federal service in Washington, in October, 1865.

Mr. Johnson has been an active member of the First African Baptist Church for 67 years; the Samaritans 65 years; Odd Fellows, 58 years; Masons, 58 years; Saint Lukes, 63 years and the National Ideals for sixteen years.

Buried With Masonic Rites

Full Mason honors were accorded this distinguished citizen as his funeral was conducted from First Baptist Church Wednesday at 2 p.m.

Mr. Johnson is survived by four daughters, Mrs. Ella Carrington, Mrs. Mamie Coleman, Mrs. Lavinia A. Banks, Mrs. Alice Johnson, and one son, W. I. Johnson, Jr. He is also survived by fourteen grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.” — The Richmond Planet

 

Sgt. Dillon Chavers Richmond National Copyright Nadia Orton 2016

Sgt. Dillon Chavers, Co. E, 5th Regiment, U. S. Colored Infantry. Richmond National Cemetery

 

“LAID TO REST – The funeral of D. J. Chavers, who died at his late residence 318 East Preston Street, took place Friday, October 15, at the Leigh Street M. E. Church, Fifth and Leigh Streets, at 2 P.M. Funeral Director A. Hayes was on time and the ceremonies at the church were simple and impressive. Rev. E. M. Mitchell, pastor, preached the funeral. On the rostrum were Rev. A. S. Thomas, D. D., Rev. W. E. Nash, Rev. S. C. Burrell, Rev. Evans Payne, D. D., Rev. T. J. King D.D.

The Scriptures were read by Rev. S. C. Burrell. Prayer was offered by Rev. A. S. Thomas, D. D. ‘Lead Kindly Light’ was sung by the choir. The call for Resolutions was answered by remarks eulogistic of the deceased, by Master Tilton of Friendship Lodge, No. 19 A. F. & A. M. He was a member of Venus Lodge, No. 46, Knights of Pythia. He had been a director of the Mechanics Savings Bank since its organization. Resolutions from that body were read by Vice-President Thomas M. Crump.

Rev. E. M. Mitchell sang a solo entitled ‘Home of the Soul.’ Ere the charming melody had died away, he began his text, which was from John 11:21.

‘Then said Martha unto Jesus, Lord, if thou hadst been here my brother had not died. He pictured the scene and the promise of the Savior that her brother would rise again.’ He dwelt upon the sterling qualities of the deceased and gave comfort to the weeping widow.

At the conclusion prayer was offered by Rev. T. J. King D. D. pastor of the Fifth Street Baptist Church. The choir sang. Funeral Director A. Hayes marshaled the pall bearers into line and the mourning throng filed out of the church. The Directors of the Mechanics Savings Bank attended the funeral in body. The casket was of finely carved oak and is known as the ‘State” casket. The funeral designs were numerous and costly. The pall-bearers were, honorary B. P. Vandervall, Col. Willis Wyatt, W. W. Hill, Dr. E. H. Jefferson, Dr. A. A. Tennant, Richard Davis, Christopher F. Foster, Ross Bolling. Active, Hezekiah Curtis, S. J. Gilpin, Thomas Liggon, J. W. Pryor, Dan Turner.

The remains were interred in the National Cemetery here. Arrangements had been made through Mr. Cosby Washington. The head stone will be 4855-A. Outside of this all that remains of D. J. Chavers has been swallowed up in that national grave yard to remain until the sounding of the last trump.” — The Richmond Planet

 

 

Cpl. Edward Stewart, Buffalo Soldier, Funeral – Richmond, Virginia 1938. Burial: Evergreen Cemetery

 

Edward Stewart, well known Richmond business man and first vice-president of the Southern Aid Society, was buried from the Second Baptist Church in Richmond Friday afternoon. The Rev. Joseph T. Hill officiated. Many Richmond businessmen and most of the executives of the Southern Aid Society attended the funeral. The picture above shows the pallbearers entering the church with the casket, covered by a large United States flag. The deceased man was formerly a member of the famed Tenth Calvary unit of the United States Army. The pallbearers are W. A. Jordan, Sr., William E. Randolph, John M. Moore, John Hall, B. A. Cephas, and Thomas Johnson.” — New Journal and Guide, January 8, 1938

 

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Filed under Civil War, In Memoriam, Memorials to Civil War Veterans, Obituary Files, Richmond, U. S. Colored Troops, USCT Diaries, Virginia

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