Category Archives: Ontario

Memorials to United States Colored Troops, Pt. 3 – Atlanta, Georgia

Memorials to United States Colored Troops

A photo-essay series dedicated to the United States Colored Troops, and how they were remembered in contemporary news media

Pt. 3

Atlanta, Georgia

South-View Cemetery

Grave of Cpl George “Union” Wilder – Co. F, 137th Regiment, U. S. Colored Infantry. The inscription includes his name, the symbol of three links, representing affiliation with the Order of Odd Fellows, his age, and “A soldier of the Civil War/was killed in the riot/ of Atlanta Sept. 26, 1906”

 

“One of the dead negroes killed in the Brownsville fight Monday night, and up to this time unknown, has been identified as George Wilder, 70 years old.” — Atlanta Journal Constitution, September 26, 1906

(Photo: Nadia K. Orton, February 15, 2012)

 

 

Grave of Bishop Henry McNeal Turner, Chaplain, 1st. U. S. Colored Infantry

 

Bishop Henry McNeal Turner (1834-1915). Library of Congress

 

“The funeral of Bishop Henry McNeal Turner, senior bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, who died at Windsor, Ontario, Canada, Saturday, May 8, will take place at Big Bethel Church, this city, on Wednesday, May 19. The remains will lay in state the day preceding the funeral. Nearly all of the bishops of the church, the general offices and many ministers are expected to be in attendance.

Bishop Turner was born in South Carolina in July, 1833. He learned his alphabet when he was nine years of age and while working for a firm of lawyers at Abbeville, S. C., was taught to read. He studied under the tutelage of his employers, history, literature and other subjects. When quite a young man he was ordained a minister of the M. E. Church, South. He later joined the African Methodist Episcopal Church and was appointed to a charge in Baltimore by the late Bishop Daniel A. Payne. While in Baltimore he studied languages and the higher branches.

First Colored Army Chaplain

During part of the Civil War he was pastor of what is now known as Metropolitan Church, Washington. President Lincoln appointed him the first colored chaplain in the Negro troops enlisted during the war. When the colored troops were established after the war, President Johnson appointed him a chaplain in the regular army. He soon resigned, however, and organized the work of the African Methodist Episcopal Church in Georgia.

He was elected manager of the publication department of the church in 1876, serving until his elevation to the bishopric in 1880. He organized the work of the denomination in Africa, as well as annual conferences in this country. He had served as a member of the legislature in Georgia and of constitutional conventions in that state. He was considered one of the most forceful characters in his denomination.

Bishop Turner was married three times. His second wife was the late Mrs. Harriett Wayman, of Baltimore, widow of Bishop Alexander Wayman. His third wife, Mrs. Laura Lemon Turner, and two sons, Jonathan and David Turner, survive.” —The New York Age, May 13, 1915

 

Ledger grave of Bishop Henry McNeal Turner

“TURNER – Bishop Henry McNeal Turner, February 1, 1834-May 9, 1915 – Grandson of an African Prince/Bishop Presiding Elder, Pastor/Chaplain (U.S. Army), State Senator (Georgia)/Organizer and Builder of the/African Methodist Episcopal Church/In Georgia, West and South Africa/Missiologist, Publisher, Activist Theologian/And Heroic Christian/

Noble and Indomitable Spirit/Rest In Peace/May God Bless

Erected by the Women’s Missionary Society/Sixth District — A.M.E. Church/June 1996/Rev. Augusta H. Hall, Jr. Archivist/Mrs. Edith W. Ming, Supervisor/Bishop Donald G. K. Ming, Presiding Prelate/

 

“VAST HOST PAY TRIBUTE TO LATE BISHOP TURNER – Seldom has a larger crowd witnessed a funeral here than the one that saw the sad last rites paid to Bishop Henry M. Turner at Big Bethel A. M. E. Church today.

Bishops of the church, general officers and visiting ministers were here to pay a last tribute of respect to the man that organized the work in Georgia, but whose influence is seen in the work being done by denomination in West and South Africa and in various sections of the United States.

The services were conducted by Bishop James S. Flipper, of this city. He paid a splendid tribute to the life of the deceased prelate. Others taking part in the services included: Bishops C. S. Smith, Levi J. Coppin, William D. Chappelle, Joshua H. Jones, H. B. Parks, B. F. Lee, C. T. Shaffer and J. M. Conner. The following bishops were unable to be present: Evans Tyree, who is presiding over the sessions of the Philadelphia Conference at Dover, Del.; J. Albert Johnson, who is in South Africa; W. H. Heard who is in West Africa, and John Hurst, who is visiting the work of the denomination in South America and the West Indies.

Telegrams of condolence and resolutions from various religious bodies eulogized the deceased bishop.

Many were the tribute paid by prominent whites here when they heard that the prelate was dead.

As was told THE AGE last week, Bishop Turner died in Windsor , Ont.; on May 8. He was born in South Carolina 83 years ago, and enjoyed the distinction of having been the first colored man appointed to a chaplaincy in the United States Army. He was elected a bishop in 1880 and had his funeral occurred one day later it would have been on the thirty-fifth anniversary of his elevation to the episcopacy.” — The New York Age, May 20, 1915

(Photos: Nadia K. Orton, February 15, 2012)

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Filed under Canada, Civil War, Georgia, In Memoriam, Memorials to Civil War Veterans, Obituary Files, Ontario, Slavery, South Carolina, U. S. Colored Troops, USCT Diaries, Virginia