Tag Archives: Civil War sailors

On Memorial Day, Reflecting on African-American History – The National Trust for Historic Preservation

First Memorial Day plaque Charleston SC Copyright Nadia Orton 2015

Plaque honoring the first Memorial Day in the United States. Hampton Park, Charleston, South Carolina. Photo: Nadia K. Orton, September 6, 2015

 

Every May, the nation marks Memorial Day, the longstanding tradition we use to recognize fallen veterans. The holiday has its origins in “Decoration Day,” originally held in Charleston, South Carolina in 1865, when thousands of former slaves, Union soldiers, and missionaries honored Union soldiers who had died in a Confederate prison and were subsequently buried in a makeshift mass grave.

Historian David Blight recounts that after the soldiers’ proper burials, a massive parade followed. Participants decorated the graves with flowers, and clergy delivered speeches to commemorate the fallen.

My personal introduction to Decoration Day began with oral histories provided by my family’s elders. In rural Tidewater, Virginia, they told stories of Decoration Day commemorations stretching back to the 1880s. Parades began in African-American communities and ended at local black cemeteries. Families and friends honored their ancestors through song and praise, while their graves were cleaned and re-decorated.

They had good reason to pay homage: Many veterans had returned from the front lines of war to become leaders in their communities, forming masonic lodges, burial societies, schools, churches, and cemeteries. These institutions formed the foundations of post-Civil War African-American communities, giving their communities potential for the very type growth and development African-Americans had been denied in slavery. READ MORE…

Leave a comment

Filed under Charleston County, Civil War, Craven County, Mississippi, New Hanover County, New York, North Carolina, Petersburg, Portsmouth, Slavery, South Carolina, U. S. Colored Troops, USCT Diaries, Virginia

Memorials to United States Colored Troops, Pt. 5 – Portsmouth, Virginia

Memorials to United States Colored Troops

A photo-essay series dedicated to the United States Colored Troops, and how they were remembered in contemporary news media

Pt. 5

Portsmouth, Virginia

Mt. Calvary Cemetery Complex, Lincoln Memorial Cemetery

 

Dred Smith Lincoln Memorial Portsmouth VA Copyright Nadia Orton 2017

Pvt. Dred Smith, Co. G, 38th Regiment, U. S. Colored Infantry. Commander, Silas Fellows Post No. 7, Grand Army of the Republic. Lincoln Memorial Cemetery (est. 1912)

 

“After an illness of two days, Mr. Dred Smith, an energetic and faithful member of G. A. R., died at his home, 612 Race street, Thursday, June 20, at 9 p.m. Funeral service was held at Emanuel A. M. E. church Sunday at 1:30 p.m. Sympathy is extended the family. Thus passes away another of the grand old landmarks.” — New Journal and Guide, June 30, 1917

(Photo: Nadia K. Orton, May 27, 2017)

 

Sgt. Nelson Carney 10 USCI Portsmouth VA Copyright Nadia Orton 2015

1st Sgt. Nelson Carney, Co. E, 10th Regiment, U. S. Colored Infantry – Mt. Calvary Cemetery (Mt. Calvary Cemetery Complex)

 

“Zion’s Oldest Deacon Dead – Mr. Nelson Carney, a well-known and respected citizen of Portsmouth, Va., died at his residence, 717 King street Sunday, November 1, at 6:15 p.m.

He was stricken at his home October 20, and sustained a brief illness of just eleven days. The funeral service was held Tuesday, at 2 p.m., at the Zion Baptist Church of which he was the oldest deacon and Sunday school teacher.

The rain did not prevent the attendance of a large number of members and friends who were anxious to pay the last tribute of respect.

Mr. Carney served in the Civil War and was a member of Silas Fellows Post No. 7, G. A. R. and Grand Chaplain of the Dept. of Va., and North Carolina.

Rev. J. M. Armistead conducted the service, and eulogistic remarks were made by Rev. E. E. Smith, A. Gomer, Commander Grandy of Dept. of Va. and North Carolina, G. A. R.

The floral tributes were numerous and beautiful and the casket was draped with a large American flag.

He is survived by five children, five grandchildren, three great-grandchildren and a host of friends.

He will be greatly missed by both the church and community. His remains were interred in (Mt.) Calvary cemetery.” — The New Journal and Guide, November 7, 1925

(Photo: Nadia K. Orton, May 23, 2015)

 

Alexander Gordon USN Portsmouth VA Copyright 2011 Nadia Orton

Alexander Gordon, USS Young Rover – Mt. Olive Cemetery (Mt. Calvary Cemetery Complex)

 

“The funeral of Alexander Gordon, a well-known colored man, who died yesterday at his residence, 633 North street, will take place from the North Street A. M. E. Church Friday at 3 p.m. Gordon, who was 70 years old had a wide acquaintance in Portsmouth, where he had lived all his life, and had the respect of all who knew him. He is survived by his widow, two sons and a daughter.” — The Portsmouth Star, August 9, 1917

(Photo: Nadia K. Orton, February 20. 2011)

Pvt. Edmond Riddick 36 USCI Portsmouth Copyright Nadia Orton 2016

Cpl. Edmond Riddick, Co. A, 36th Regiment, U. S. Colored Infantry – Mt. Calvary Cemetery (Mt. Calvary Cemetery Complex)

 

“Death Claims Prominent Citizen – The funeral services of Com. Edmond Riddick, who died after a brief illness at midnight Thursday, took place from Zion Baptist Church last Sunday at 1:15 p.m. Rev. E. E. Smith, pastor, officiated assisted by Revs. J. M. Armistead, D. D., W. H. Willis and W. Miller. Rev. Smith spoke from those words, “Be thou faithful unto death and I will give thee a crown of life.” He paid a glowing tribute to Mr. Riddick’s loyalty and faithfulness to the church and community. Dr. Armistead stressed his straight forwardness and character, pronouncing it the best he has known in any man. “A Charge To Keep I Have,” and “I Am But A Stranger Here,” the favorite hymns of the deceased were sung. The Roland Hayes Glee Club sang, very effectively, “Sleep Sweetly, Tender Heart.”

The large concourse and numerous floral tributes bore unspeakable evidence of the esteem and worth in which he was held.

At the age of seventeen he enlisted in the Civil War, Co. A 36th Regiment U. S. C. Inf., served throughout the war, was honorably discharged at Brazos, Texas. Mr. Riddick was commander of Silas Fellows Post, member of Evening Star, Lodge of Odd Fellows, Grand Master’s Council and the Teamster’s Association.

Two sons, Richard Riddick and W. E. Riddick, survive him.

The following members of the Col. Young Post Spanish War Veterans, Moses Shepherd, Albert Holliday, Chas. Ahrens, Alex Davis, James Tann, Albert Baker and Hall served as active pall bearers. Messrs. L. Mingo, Mason, Solomon Vann Sr., Wellington Jefferson were honorary pall bearers.

The members of the Grand Army were with the family.

The body was laid away in the family plot in Mt. Calvary Cemetery.” — New Journal and Guide, June 26, 1926

(Photo: Nadia K. Orton, February 6, 2017)

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Civil War, In Memoriam, Memorials to Civil War Veterans, Portsmouth, U. S. Colored Troops, USCT Diaries, Virginia

Memorials to United States Colored Troops, Pt. 2 – Norfolk, Virginia

Memorials to United States Colored Troops

A photo-essay series dedicated to the United States Colored Troops, and how they were remembered in contemporary news media

Pt. 2

Norfolk, Virginia

West Point Cemetery, Calvary Cemetery

Cornelius Garner Service Record

“Civil War Veteran Dies at Age of 94 — Cornelius Garner, one of the city’s oldest residents, passed away on Sunday morning after a long illness.

He was within less than a month of being ninety-five years of age, having been born in St. Mary’s County, Md., on February 11, 1846.

He was one of the last two surviving members of the Local Grand Army of the Republic organization.

He joined the Federal army upon his escape from slavery at the age of eighteen years. Following his discharge from the army, he had worked as a farmer, seaman, oyster-shucker, and landscape gardener.

Mr. Garner’s funeral was held Wednesday afternoon at two-thirty o’clock from the First Baptist Church of which he had been a member for more than sixty-nine years. The eulogy will be delivered by the pastor, the Rev. Richard H. Bowling.

Military honors were paid the deceased by the local Spanish-American War Veterans. Men of this group will also serve as active pallbearers, along with members of the local Star of the East Lodge of Odd Fellows and the St. Jon’s Lodge of Good Samaritans.

The connection of the deceased with these organizations dates back a full sixty years.

BURIED IN CALVARY

One of the interesting coincidences regarding the deceased is that he will be interred in Calvary Cemetery just outside of which is a large roadside marker of the site as a camp for Federal soldiers during the Civil War.

Mr. Garner himself was stationed in this camp as a young army recruit and many a day marched from there down to Bute St. and past the small brick church that then occupied the site of the present First Baptist Church.

Mr. Garner is survived by his widow, Mrs. Mary Davis Garner, formerly of Portsmouth. Other survivors include nieces and nephews.

According to his pastor, secret plans had been on foot to have the congregation give a surprise celebration of Mr. Garner’s birthday in consideration both of his advanced age and his being the oldest surviving male member.” – The New Journal and Guide, February 1, 1941

 

Charles Grandy USN Norfolk VA Copyright 2015 Nadia Orton

Charles Grandy, USS St. Lawrence – Calvary Cemetery, Norfolk, Virginia

 

“Comrade Charles Grandy, Norfolk’s last surviving colored veteran of the War Between the States, will not participate in the Memorial Day celebration this year. Death overtook him just twenty days before the annual celebration, and a few months before he reached his 100th birthday.

Mr. Grandy passed away on Saturday at his home, 609 Smith Street to join his old friend comrade Cornelius Garner who died last year, and his brother Willis, whose passing Friday night preceded his by a scant few hours.

In impressive double funeral services which were conducted at St. John A. M. E. Church for the Messrs. Grandy by the Rev. H. M. Shields, Comrade Grandy’s long career came to an end.

Pays Tribute to Life

Taking his text from Mark: 13-35, the speaker paid tribute to the church life of the deceased and point out the fact that the late Mr. Grandy was only 47 years younger than the A. M. E. connection.

The deceased was accorded full military honors with members of the United Spanish American War Veterans with Veterans of Foreign Wars serving as honorary and active pall-bearers.

Born as a slave on the old Cook plantation in Camden, N. C., January 31, 1842, young Grandy picked cotton and plowed corn with the other slaves, but one day he stole up the river to Hampton Roads to join the Union forces.

(After the war Mr. Grandy became a foreman down at Great Bridge and during that time helped to build his home on Smith street, and the first building owned by St. John A. M. E. Church.

But his greatest pleasure came from recounting his experiences as acting general in the G. A. R. Upon his suggestion, the annual convention was held in Springfield, Ill., last August and he left his sick bed to make the trip.

His niece Mrs. Charleston who has been his nurse for the past eight years, tried to discourage all plans for the trip, and in a final effort, asked Comrade Grandy just what he was going to do in case something happened.

“Suppose you get sick on the train?” she said.

“Well, Hale will know before you,’ replied the old soldier as he climbed aboard the train for Springfield.

He repeated incidents of what last convention often and always told about his visit to Abraham Lincoln’s grave.

“When I found it I wept for joy,” he was accustomed to saying, “and I just stretched out on that grave and went to sleep.”

He was the true soldier up to the very last and always insisted upon receiving his company downstairs because coming up to his bedroom made him “feel like sick.”

This same spirit was demonstrated several years ago when he refused to ride in the car which had been provided for the veterans. He walked about ten city blocks before he collapsed in the wheelchair which was being pushed behind him.” — New Journal and Guide, May 24, 1941

(Photo: Nadia K. Orton, May 26, 2015)

A A Portlock West Point Norfolk

Anthony A. Portlock, Ward Room Steward, USS Minnesota 1862-1864 – West Point Cemetery, Norfolk

 

“Mr. Anthony A. Portlock one of Norfolk’s best known and most estimable citizens who has been ailing at his residence on Johnson Avenue, for sometime and who had sufficiently recovered to be able to resume his duty in connection with an office in the Maryland was taken suddenly ill Wednesday evening last from which he never rallied, death claiming him as a victim about 12 o’clock his funeral took place Sunday afternoon from the Bank St. Baptist at 2:30, Rev. H. H. Mitchell, D. D., the pastor, officiating, assisted by several of the local clergymen. Calloiux Post, No. 2, of which the deceased was a member attended the funeral in body; Dahlgreen, 4; Shaw 5, and Silas Fellow, 7, of Portsmouth, united with Callioux Post in respect to the deceased. The interrment was in West Point Cemetery, the remains being followed to their last resting place by a host of friends. The deceased was a consistent Christian for forty years. He left several children, Messrs. L. H. Portlock, Randall Portlock, Miss Nina Portlock and Mrs. Mary ——; and his wife Mrs. Mary Portlock and another young son to mourn their loss.” — Richmond Planet, 1898

“The colored G. A. R. Posts of Norfolk and Portsmouth attended the funeral Sunday of Anthony Portlock, a well known colored man.” – The Norfolk-Virginian, February 1, 1898

(Photo: Nadia K. Orton, October 30, 2012)

 

Pvt. Marshall Land 2 USCC Copyright 2015 Nadia Orton

Pvt. Marshall Land, Co. H, 2nd Regiment, U. S. Colored Cavalry – Calvary Cemetery, Norfolk, Virginia

 

“Rev. Marshall Land, one of Norfolk’s most prominent and influential citizens, and a member of those fast depleting ranks of the Grand Army of the Republic, an old settler in the town, died at his residence at the corner of Goff and Bolton streets, Saturday, June 30, at 12:15 o’clock, in his 75th year.

Rev. Land had been in declining health for some time, but with strong constitutional powers, he remarkably withstood his ailments and the bearing down of the infirmities of age, until about two weeks before his death when he was forced to take to his bed.

Although, having resigned from actively holding pastorates for more than a dozen years ago, upon the advice of his physician on account of a throat infection, Rev. Land for forty years previous to that time had been a power in the Baptist ministry and held enviable influence in the denomination until the day of his death.

Built Several Churches

He founded a number of churches in Norfolk county years before Norfolk city comprised that section where his home was. He built a church in Shouler’s Hill, one in Bower’s Hill and Ebenezer Baptist Church in Norfolk county, and pastored these charges for several years.

Rev. Land had been a member of the First Baptist Church of this city, for over 49 years and would have celebrated his 50th year membership there in September. The congregation under the leadership of pastor R. H. Bowling was at the time of his death planning to give him a grand surprise celebration on his fiftieth anniversary as a member of the church.

Marshall Land practically settled Barboursville, having been one of the first residents in that section, it was thru the great respect that the most influential white citizens of Norfolk city and county held for him, he was able to aid any number of families to become home owners in Barboursville.

In this respect his civic pride never waned. He always urged those whom he knew to buy homes and he lived to see what was a sparse settlement when he moved there, to become a fine residence section with colored home owners.

Member School Board

Besides preaching the gospel, building churches and going among his people as an apostle of home ownership, Rev. Land found time in his earlier days to take a hand now and then in Norfolk county politics. That he was a man of large influence was recognized by those around the county courthouse, and to be in the favor of Marshall Land was a coveted desire of young aspirants for county offices. He was made a member of Norfolk County School Board in those days when his residence sat in the county and many of the teachers owed their appointments to Rev. Land’s influence.

An impressive echo from those days when Negroes were in the midst of the political arena in Norfolk county was the appearance of Lawyer R. H. Bagby, white, of Portsmouth, at the funeral of Rev. Marshall Land. Lawyer Bagby was, too, one time a power in county politics.

Rev. Land’s funeral was held Tuesday at the First Baptist Church. Rev. J. M. Armistead, dean of the Baptist Ministry in Tidewater, and pastor of Zion Baptist Church, Portsmouth, delivered the funeral sermon. Dr. Armistead stated that when he came to this section 45 years ago Rev. Marshall Land was one of the first Baptist ministers he met here.

A large crowd attended the funeral. Rev. Armistead was assisted by Dr. Bowling, pastor of First Baptist. Eulogies were read by Rev. C. C. Somerville, on behalf of the Tidewater Ministerial Alliance; Rev. Saunders, of Princess Anne County, and a former pastor of Shiloh Baptist Church here; Rev. Metz, Rev. Black, former and present pastors of Shiloh respectively; Andrew Young, deacon of a church built by Rev. Land; Attorney R. H. Bagby, of Portsmouth.

Solos were sung by Mr. Lawrence Harrison, Mr. Paul Langley and Madame Wimberly.

Eastern Light Lodge of Masons and Grand Army of the Republic, both of which Rev. Land was a member, held ritualistic services at the bier. The deceased was one of the oldest members of the lodge.

He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Sophia Land; four children, Mrs. Marcella Paige, Mrs. Ella Fauckland, Mr. Russell Land, of New York city, and attorney Walter H. Land, of this city, and 14 grandchildren and 4 great grandchildren.

A number of white friends of the deceased attended the funeral. Interment was in Calvary Cemetery, under the direction of undertaker W. C. Baker.” — Norfolk Journal and Guide, July 7, 1923

(Photo: Nadia K. Orton, May 23, 2015)

 

Cpl Daniel Langley 2 USCI Norfolk Copyright Nadia Orton 2012

Cpl. Daniel Langley, Co. B, 2nd Regiment, U. S. Colored Infantry – West Point Cemetery, Norfolk, Virginia

 

“The funeral of Mr. Daniel Langley, who died at his home on East Brambleton avenue Tuesday, will be held at St. John’s A. M. E. Church, of which he had been a member for 50 years Friday at 2 o’clock.

Mr. Langley was 84 years of age, was one of Norfolk’s oldest and best known citizens. He had been in declining health for about ten years. He was a Civil War Veteran and an active member of the G. A. R.

For years Mr. Langley conducted a shoe repair shop on Charlotte street, giving up that occupation on account of failing health and later entering the Navy Yard.

He is survived by a brother, Mr. St. Paul Langley; sister, Mrs. Lucile Proctor and a foster-daughter, Mrs. Sallie T. Dickey, all of Norfolk.” — Norfolk Journal and Guide, October 2, 1926

(Photo: Nadia K. Orton, November 6, 2012)

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Chesapeake, Civil War, In Memoriam, Memorials to Civil War Veterans, Norfolk, Norfolk County, Slavery, U. S. Colored Troops, USCT Diaries, Virginia

Protected: Portsmouth, Virginia: The Leon A. Turner Family and interconnections, Mt. Olive Cemetery

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

Enter your password to view comments.

Filed under Anne Arundel County, Brunswick County, Delaware, Maryland, New Hanover County, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Portsmouth, Prince George County, Slavery, Stories in Stone, U. S. Colored Troops, Virginia, Wilmington

The Descendants Corner: Update – John Hodges, Civil War Sailor, Mt. Olive Cemetery

John Hodges, USN

John Hodges, USN

The replacement gravestone for Landsman John Hodges was installed in Mt. Olive Cemetery, Portsmouth, Virginia, on December 30, 2015. We received the news from his descendant, Vivian Nicholson. John Hodges (1819-1885) served aboard the USS Lenapee during the Civil War, enlisting on April 22, 1864, and was the grandfather of Portsmouth native William Henry Nicholson, the first African American hired by the New York City Fire Department (FDNY). Vivian shared William’s story with us in a guest blog, which can be read here.

 

A picture of the old gravestone.

A picture of the old gravestone.

 

Landsman John Hodges (1819-1885), Mt. Olive Cemetery

Landsman John Hodges (1819-1885), Mt. Olive Cemetery

2 Comments

Filed under Civil War, North Carolina, Portsmouth, The Descendants Corner, Tombstone Tales, U. S. Colored Troops, USCT Diaries, Virginia

The Descendants Corner: William H. Nicholson, First African-American Fireman of the FDNY

Guest post by Vivian Nicholson-Mueller

 

My parents divorced when I was 5 years old, and when my father left the family he took all his family history with him. I knew nothing about the Nicholson side of my family — just that we carried his name.  It was not until many decades later that I got an inkling that I might be related to the first black man who joined the New York City Fire Department — and it came about because of the lawsuit brought against the city by the Vulcan Society, the association of black firefighters. 

My brother Keith had read an August 28, 2009 New York Times article about the suit, and in it there was a mention of a black fireman named William E. (sic) Nicholson.

“After Bias Ruling, Firefighter Applicants Look Back – Black firefighters remain scarce more than a hundred years after the department hired its first African-American employee: William E. Nicholson, a 27-year-old former cement tester, joined the Fire Department in 1898 and took care of the horses, said John L. Ruffins, a former Fire Department captain who has researched the history of the department.” – New York Times, August 28, 2009
Keith asked if we could be related to him and I exclaimed, “Related to him?!  He was our great-grandfather!”
A few years prior I had begun to research my paternal family. The reason: I was diagnosed with an unusual medical condition. I was told by the doctor to research my family’s medical history. While awaiting the analysis of a copious amount of blood taken, I got busy.
 
I knew nothing about my father except he was a “Junior.” Born in 1925, his mother’s name was Ruth (my middle name), and they were both born in Brooklyn, New York, as was my grandfather. My father’s paternal grandmother was known as Grandma Nicky. All of my father’s WWII service records were lost in a fire so I began to research on Ancestry.com.  After many days of searching I found my grandfather, Frederick Howard, Sr., in the 1900 Brooklyn census. I was ecstatic! And, it listed his mother Irene, and father, William H. Nicholson, who was born in Virginia.  His profession, “fireman.” A black fireman in 1900 NYC?!  I thought perhaps I had misread the somewhat illegible enumeration and dismissed it. But the 1910 census again noted he was a “Fireman” in the “Fire Department.”
William H. Nicholson Family, 1900 Census, Brooklyn, New York

William H. Nicholson Family, 1900 Census, Brooklyn, New York. Ancestry.com

 

William H. Nicholson Family, 1910 Census, Brooklyn, New York. Ancestry.com

William H. Nicholson Family, 1910 Census, Brooklyn, New York. Ancestry.com

Now knowing the names of my great grandparents I went to the NYC archives and found their death certificates. William’s death certificate listed “fireman” as his profession, but this time he was noted as “Fireman NYFD.”  I was intrigued.  Could it possibly be true?

When my brother read the article to me I had the confirmation I needed.  Mining information from Ancestry.com I found: William H. Nicholson, Jr., born in 1869 in Portsmouth, Virginia. His father was William H. Nicholson Sr., born in Enfield, North Carolina.  His mother Katherine, born in Portsmouth, was a Hodges. Her father was John Hodges, who had served in the Navy during the Civil War, and her mother, Martha Jordan, was descended from the Edenton, North Carolina Jordans. They were members of the North Street Emanuel AME Church, and along with other Nicholsons, Hodges, and Jordans, were interred in Mt Olive Cemetery in Portsmouth.

John Hodges USN Portsmouth Orton

Landsman John Hodges, Civil War Navy Veteran, maternal grandfather of William H. Nicholson. Mt. Olive Cemetery, Portsmouth, Va. John Hodges’ headstone will be replaced this year by the US Dept. of Veterans Affairs. Photo: Nadia K. Orton

Emanuel A.M.E. Church Portsmouth Orton

Emanuel A.M.E. Church (1772). Portsmouth, Virginia. Photo: Nadia K. Orton

 

In 1885, William enlisted in the Navy and served on the USS Pensacola. He was only 15 at the time, but lied saying he was 19. According to census information, he moved to Brooklyn in 1887. In January of 1889, William again served in the Navy, again as a “waiter.”  He later worked as a messenger and cement tester. On October 9, 1889, he married Irene Howard (my Great-Grandma Nicky), whose family could trace its lineage back to Colonial Long Island, New York free people of colour and Sellacott and Montaukett Indians. Married into a solid middle class and influential New York family, and being related to the Virginian and New York Hodges, he was politically connected to the Republican party.  On November 9, 1898 with the backing of Republican party bigwigs and a white high ranking Fire Department chief, he began his fireman’s instruction at the Brooklyn Fire Department School. He had previously taken the written fireman’s test and, according to an article in the November 13, 1898 issue of The New York Press, passed with a score which was “one of the highest in percentage on the list.” The article also noted “There is no law to deprive his race from the right of such an appointment, but Nicholson is the first colored man to successfully pass the examinations.” William completed his training on December 9, 1898 and in 1900 and 1910 he could proudly list his profession as “fireman.”

Finding no information about my great-grandfather in NYFD records, I turned to the New York Public Library, and was directed to Harlem’s Schomburg Library. When I realized there was an entire collection dedicated to the Vulcan Society and the city’s earliest black firefighters, my heart skipped with excitement.  Would I find something about my great-grandfather there? Indeed I did!

I found a treasure trove of information about the late 19th Century and early 20th Century fire department. Documents compiled by former Fire Commissioner Robert Lowery, the 1st black fire commissioner,  indicating that my great-grandfather, William H. Nicholson, had become, in 1898, the first “coloured” man hired by the NYC Fire Department! 

11-12-1898 NYT Nicholson Orton

November 12, 1898. New York Times

First Colored Fireman in This City – Fire Commissioner Scannell has appointed twenty-one new fireman on probation, for duty in the Borough of Brooklyn. W. H. Nicholson, one of the men, is colored. He has the distinction of being the first colored fireman in the department. The Commissioner found his name on the eligible list of Brooklyn, and thought he had a right to an appointment. Nicholson, who lives at 200 Myrtle Avenue, Brooklyn, has been assigned to Engine Company 6.

I also found evidence that although William had one of the highest scores on the city test and had successfully finished his training, he was immediately rejected by his “fellow” firefighters in Brooklyn Engine Co 6.  Upon his assignment, the captain quit and many others threatened to do so.  The solution: send him to the Manhattan Veterinary Unit to care for the horses – since he showed “a natural ability” to handle them.  

To my delight and profound sadness I found an 1898 Brooklyn Engine Co 6 journal that covered the first year of William’s service. It detailed how he reported day after day in full uniform – when he was finally given one – only to be sent “to Manhattan”.  There is no evidence that William ever fought a fire.  He may have done so on the 4th of July when all firefighters were called to duty. But my great-grandfather continued to report for duty for 13 years – until his very early death, on January 21, 1912, at the age of 42. The cause of death was heart trouble and asthma.  And when he died he was not listed in the 1912 memorial brochure issued by the NYFD.  He was simply and purposely ignored and then forgotten.  And he would have remained so if not for the Vulcan Society suit, the Schomburg and Ginger Adams Otis, a New York Daily News reporter who wrote the book Firefight.  Ginger and I are determined to have a plaque put on William’s grave to honour his achievements.

Nicholson Obit 22 Jan 1912 Brooklyn Daily Eagle Orton

January 22, 1912. Brooklyn Daily Eagle

William Henry Nicholson, aged 43 years, the only colored fireman of this borough, died at his residence, 163 Fort Greene place yesterday. Mr. Nicholson was born at Portsmouth, Va., and was one of five sons and daughters of Mr. and Mrs. Nicholson of Portsmouth, Va. He was educated in the schools of Portsmouth and joined the North Street A. M. E. Church of that city in 1885. He had been a resident of Brooklyn for nearly twenty-three years and served as a fireman for fourte(e)n years. On January 1, of this year, he was retired as a fireman on annuity of $700, owing to ill health. While a fireman he was attached to the headquarters department on Jay street. A few years ago he, with many others united with Bridge Street African M. E. Church. The funeral services will be at Bridge Street African M. E. Church tomorrow evening, at 8 o’clock. Mr. Nicholson is survived by his widow, two sons, Clarence and Frederick Howard; his parents, a sister, Mrs. Fannie Ash, and two brothers.”

When I was a little girl, being a great fan of Nancy Drew and Elliott Ness, I wanted to be a “FBI Man.” I was told, on a 6th grade class trip to Washington, on our visit to The FBI Building, that “girls aren’t allowed to be FBI agents.”  I was devastated, to say the least.  I cannot help but wonder if I had known what my Great-Grandfather William H. Nicholson had achieved in his life, against all odds, enduring abject prejudice and rejection, I would have indeed achieved my dream of becoming a member of the FBI. – Vivian Nicholson-Mueller, New York


On January 24, 1912, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported that William Henry Nicholson had been laid to rest in Brooklyn’s The Evergreens Cemetery. Members of the Society of the Sons of Virginia, and William’s sister, Fannie Franklin Nicholson Ash, a teacher in Portsmouth, Va., attended the funeral services at Bridge Street African Methodist Episcopal Church, once a station on the Underground Railroad. “First Colored Fireman Dead,” read the headline of William’s obituary in the January 25, 1912 edition of The New York Age. Discriminated against in life, and nearly forgotten for over a century after his death, William’s story is finally being told. The author of our guest post, William’s great-granddaughter Vivian Nicholson-Mueller, was profiled about her discoveries in a recent article for the New York Daily News, and the book by journalist Ginger Adams Otis, Firefight: The Century Long Battle to Integrate NY’s Bravest, was released earlier this year. The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, whose archival collections contain the ledger that helped Vivian discover her pioneering ancestor, is celebrating its 90th Anniversary. Thinking on what Vivian Nicholson-Mueller was able to accomplish in her research, I asked Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad, director of the Schomburg Center, for his thoughts on the importance of the preservation of archival documentation and historic sites, and how they may help connect African-Americans to their ancestral pasts. I end this blog with his response.

“The preservation of historical material is critical to building a foundation of knowledge about those who came before. Wisdom is not just smart ideas; wisdom is brilliance, whether in word or deed, that has stood the test of time.” – Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad

 

1 Comment

Filed under Civil War, New York, North Carolina, Portsmouth, The Descendants Corner, U. S. Colored Troops, Virginia

Protected: Memorial Day: Mt. Calvary Cemetery Complex, a photo essay

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

Enter your password to view comments.

Filed under Civil War, In Memoriam, Lincolnsville, U. S. Colored Troops

Stories in Stone: Thomas Craig and the Ortons of Tidewater, Va. — My Mission as a Freedom Storyteller

Thomas Craig USN USS Franklin - Mt. Olive Cem

Thomas Craig Headstone – Mt. Olive Cemetery

Thomas Craig. So reads the name on the faded and sunken headstone of military issue in Mount Olive Cemetery, one of the oldest African-American cemeteries in Portsmouth, Virginia. Part of the Mt. Calvary Cemetery Complex (Fisher’s Hill) (est. 1879), I first noticed Thomas Craig’s gravestone in Mt. Olive on a humid July 4th holiday weekend in 2007, searching for ancestral grave sites with my family. Not being aware of any known map, we walked the entire cemetery, and in doing so, passed the Craig gravestone several times. At the time, my focus was on finding any and all headstones with the name “Orton.” My paternal ancestry stretches back to 1690 in the Tidewater area of Virginia. My grand-aunt, Philgrador Rachel Orton Duke, was concerned about the lasting legacy of our family line. Born in 1923 in a home on Griffin Street, she was a life-time Portsmouth resident. Before her passing in March of 2007, she called my father and other relatives to her bedside in Maryview Hospital, with the admonition “do not let our history die.” Hearing that call, I concentrated fully on researching the paternal side of my family tree. I’d dabbled in genealogy since 2001, but now I had a mission. This was my grand-aunt’s last wish. Honoring this wish led us to the Mt. Calvary Cemetery Complex.

With further research, I discovered that our ancestors had visited and tended to family plots from some of the first burials performed in the early 1880s through to the early 1940s. However, elders that live in and around Portsmouth informed me that by the late 1940s, the Mt. Calvary Cemetery Complex was about full, and the then existing owner allowed it to become overgrown in the decades that followed. By 1960, the cemetery complex was nearly impassable, and was closed by the city soon thereafter. Trees, vines, poison ivy, and trash came to dominate what was once the premier burial ground and one of the earliest institutions of Portsmouth’s African American community (Portsmouth cemeteries were segregated until 1975). Visitation had largely ceased, and calls for its care and restoration by the Portsmouth branch of the NAACP, pastors, lodges, and various civic groups went unheeded. With Lincoln Memorial cemetery (1912), and the graveyards of Grove Baptist and Olive Branch Church (and eventually, Greenlawn Memorial Gardens in Chesapeake) becoming the primary cemeteries of Portsmouth’s black community, the Mt. Calvary Cemetery Complex fell into shadow, a forgotten area of the old city.

Mt. Calvary Cem Photo - 1960s

Mt. Calvary Cemetery Complex, 1964 – Library of Virginia

Due to almost two generations of family being unable to visit the Mt. Calvary Cemetery Complex between 1945 and 1993, the exact locations of our ancestors’ grave sites were unknown. Although necessary, walking the entire cemetery (several times) in the heat was almost unbearable, with the mosquitoes the size of small birds. There were hundreds of grave stones, each representing family legacies. Spotted were the Norcoms, Pontons, Riddicks, Bakers, Baileys, and many others, including Thomas Craig. Our forebears and the black community of Portsmouth once held the cemeteries as a sacred place, honoring their ancestors each Decoration Day, making them the end point of annual Memorial Day parade ceremonies. The New Journal and Guide wrote a story about one of these Portsmouth Memorial Day parades to Mt. Calvary in 1917. Our elders visited regularly for over sixty years. So as we walked through the cemeteries on that blistering day, I’d have to say we were propelled less by stubbornness (a family trait), and more with the goal of reestablishing this family and cultural tradition.

100_0201

Max J. and Jerusha C. Orton, 2007 – Mt. Olive Cemetery

With a little luck, we did eventually find five of our Portsmouth ancestors on that humid July 4th, scattered about different sections of the cemetery complex. One was Max Jolly Orton (1850-1902), my paternal third great-grandfather and Navy veteran. He’s buried in the rear of Mt. Olive Cemetery next to his second wife, Jerusha Copeland (1861-1928), who descends from a line of free persons of color out of Nansemond County (now Suffolk). His first wife, Jerusha Elliott (1850-1873), my third great-grandmother and also a descendant of free persons of color, is buried in the Pig Point (now Harbour View) area of Suffolk. I’ve yet to find her grave site.

The next stop on our genealogical journey was a trip over to Lincoln Memorial Cemetery (1912), before heading home. We didn’t have a map for Lincoln either, but were again lucky in finding an entire burial plot containing the grave sites of Virginius Young (1868-1928) and family, my paternal second great-grandfather, great grandparents, and other ancestors. It all seemed rather fated, as they were located just to the side of one of the main drives, ten feet from the entrance. Although Lincoln was generally in better condition than Mt. Calvary, we could still see evidence of a pattern of neglect suffered by black cemeteries in the area and nationwide. Cemeteries are institutions that anchor communities and memory. Lincoln Memorial and Mt. Calvary were two of the first such institutions that African-Americans in Portsmouth had formed after the Civil War. So many other buildings and structures that once bore the names of important figures in African-American history in Portsmouth have been torn down or had their names changed, making these cemeteries some of the last tangible sites to tell the tale of over two hundred years of their contributions to the City of Portsmouth. Yet there’s constant flooding, downed trees, trash, and irregular maintenance. Many gravestones are lost, vandalized, or sinking. The history and legacy that can be learned from these sites is on the verge of becoming lost forever.

Lincoln 2

Lincoln Memorial Cemetery

At Lincoln Memorial, I thought again about Thomas Craig’s gravestone in Mt. Olive cemetery, sunken halfway into the ground, showing evidence of lawn mower damage. Why did I keep passing his grave site? I wondered. On a whim, we went back to Mt. Olive, and I cleared away the dirt from the area beneath his name. After all, I’d yet to encounter the Craig surname in my study of the cemetery to date, and thought it unusual for the area. Once clear, the inscription read “US Navy.” So, he was a 19th century navy veteran, like my third great-grandfather, Max Orton. “Craig”, I thought, “I wonder where he’s from? Did he serve on the same ship(s) as Max?” Both of their headstones were weathered to the same degree. Were they buried around the same time? Who was he?

Admittedly, I did not return to my query until recently. One aspect of my research involves the study of my ancestors’ and other African-American veterans’ contribution to their liberation in the Civil War, and the ongoing struggle for self-respect and dignity in their involvement in all other wars fought by the United States, including the Spanish-American War, World Wars I and II, and Vietnam. I will make reference to the individual contributions of other ancestors in future writings. Here, I’d like to mention one of my forebears, Daniel Orton, a member of Company A, First Regiment, United States Colored Infantry. Escaping slavery in the Sleepy Hole area of Suffolk, he’d made his way to Baltimore, Maryland, and enlisted on May 19, 1863. He lost his life at the age of only twenty-two on June 15, 1864, at the Siege of Petersburg, Virginia. His sacrifice made me think of all the other men of African descent from Portsmouth that participated in every war since the American Revolution. I’d found out so many details about Max Orton, that he served in the Navy over twenty years until his death in 1902. He was of a small build, five foot one and one-half inches, and lived on Green Street and at 223 Fort Lane, which was just down the way from Cedar Grove Cemetery, and is now the current site of Harbor Point Behavioral Health. The area was once on the border of Lincolnsville, the historic African-American community that began around 1885, and was its own self-contained community until it was demolished in the 1960s, the first project of Portsmouth’s Urban Renewal Program. I’ll be writing more about Lincolnsville and my ancestors in the coming months.

223 Fort Lane 1960 Lincolnsville Assess picture

223 Fort Lane, Portsmouth – 1960

As I delved into research on Max Orton’s life in Portsmouth, my mind kept drifting back to his Navy counterpart, Thomas Craig. I’d passed his headstone so many times looking for Max’s grave site, I couldn’t help but wonder if it wasn’t for a reason. So, six years after I first found him, I decided to take a look into his life. What I would find out about Thomas Craig would lead me on a trail from Portsmouth to 19th century Delaware, a major center of abolitionism and Underground Railroad activity before and during the Civil War, to Union Navy recruitment in New York, to the South China Sea, with an ultimate return to Portsmouth and subsequent glimpse into its African-American community of the post-Civil War era.

Thomas Craig was born in 1831 in northeastern Delaware. Different accounts point to his birth in Wilmington, New Castle County, or Smyrna, New Kent County. His parents, Noah and Sarah Craig, were free persons of color. New Kent County was largely a more rural area, while Wilmington and New Castle County were more industrialized.

Delaware 1775 Map - Hundreds Del Genealogical Soc

Delaware “Hundreds” 1775 – Delaware State Archives

Compared to other slave states, such as Maryland and Virginia, Delaware had a rather high percentage of free African-Americans. By 1810, nearly 76% of the African-American population was free, compared to 23% in Maryland, and 7.2% in Virginia. By 1861, the percentage was over 92%. Delaware, as in other states of the country, saw a rise in abolitionist fervor after the Revolution, perhaps spurred by its idealism. This was in part due to a concentration of Quaker anti-slavery activity in the region. Gradual emancipation was preferable to large-scale anti-slavery efforts the State may have enacted. Delaware passed its first private manumission act in 1787, and individual acts of emancipation were the most successful part of this new movement.

A review of Federal Census records from 1830, 1840, and 1850 helped to place the members of Thomas Craig’s family in this period. In 1830, a Noah Craig is living in Appoquinimink Hundred (est. 1682), New Castle County, Delaware, head of a household of six free persons of color. In Delaware, a hundred is defined as a “sub-county division in England and were introduced in some of the British colonies. For Delaware, the origin is cited as a letter written in 1682 by William Penn, the newly appointed Lord Proprietor of the province of Pennsylvania and the counties on the Delaware. Penn directed that from this point onward, settlements be divided into sections of 100 families. The first use of the term Hundred in official records relating to the Delaware colony dates to 1687, when reference is made to ‘a list of taxables of north side of Duck Creek Hundred’” (Delaware State Archives)

Noah Craig is listed in the 1840 Census living in Brandywine Hundred, New Castle County, Delaware. He is noted as born between 1786 and 1804 (the census estimate), with two sons under the age of ten, a spouse, possibly Sarah, born between 1805 and 1816, and one additional female born between 1817 and 1830. One person in the household, most likely Noah, is listed as working in agriculture.

By 1850, Noah and Sarah Craig, ages fifty-nine and sixty-four, respectively, are documented in New Castle Hundred, New Castle County. Thomas Craig is listed in the 1850 Federal Census of Appoquinimink Hundred, New Castle County, age twenty-one, laborer, living on the farm of Robert M. Latimer.

Although Thomas Craig and his family were part of a thriving and progressive community of free African-Americans, white majority fears of this growing population were a direct result, and between 1800 through 1850, the Delaware State legislature passed laws curtailing the rights of free African-Americans in everything from the right to vote, to a law against being unemployed while poor. As seen in the recent film “12 Years a Slave,” free African-Americans were also at constant risk of being kidnapped and sold into slavery down South.

USS Vermont after the Civil War. Navsource.org

USS Vermont after the Civil War. Navsource.org

Perhaps in response to these crippling and repressive measures, and in search of better economic opportunity, by 1855, Thomas Craig had left Delaware, and taken up residence in New York. Military records show he enlisted in the U.S. Navy aboard the USS Vermont, and in doing so would join the ranks of the few hundred African-Americans serving in the Navy before 1861, a number that would soon swell to over 19,000 (with an additional 180,000 in the US Army) through the duration of the Civil War. The Vermont, a ship-of-the-line, was first laid down in 1818, one of nine, 74-gun warships authorized by Congress. Although she was completed by 1825, she remained essentially mothballed in the Boston Navy Yard until commissioned in late 1861. From 1862 to 1864, the USS Vermont was anchored in Port Royal, South Carolina, functioning primarily as a support, store, and hospital ship for the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. After two years, the USS Vermont returned to New York.

While aboard the USS Vermont from 1855 to 1864, Thomas Craig had served a total of nine years with a predominantly African-American crew, a common occurrence on supply and support vessels during the Civil War. Joseph P. Reidy, in his article “Black Men in Navy Blue During the Civil War,” notes that the “disproportionate presence of black sailors on supply ships” in many ways was a direct result of the “broader cultural biases that associated persons of African descent with menial labor and personal service.” Upon the Vermont’s return to New York, Thomas Craig transferred to and served aboard the USS Hartford in 1865, which became part of the Asiatic squadron formed after the Civil War.

Upon his discharge from the USS Hartford in 1868, Thomas Craig served aboard the storeship USS Guard, and the sloop USS Swatara. He arrived in the Tidewater area aboard the Swatara and transferred to the USS New Hampshire in 1869 after the Swatara was decommissioned.

Though not found on the 1870 Federal Census, military records place Thomas Craig as a resident of Portsmouth, Virginia by 1871.

Rev. John H. Offer, 1825-1902

Rev. John H. Offer, 1825-1902. Emanuel A.M.E. archives.

He would there join a growing, vibrant African-American community in the city, with recently elected city councilmen, newly established churches, businesses, and benevolent and fraternal organizations. On October 8, 1874, during his service on the USS New Hampshire, Thomas Craig married Mary Manger Butt, a widow from Brunswick County, Virginia, daughter of James Manger and Violet Rivers. According to the marriage certificate, the ceremony was performed “at nine o’clock at night in Portsmouth” by Reverend John H. Offer, a Baptist minister originally from Anne Arundel County, Maryland. A Civil War veteran, Rev. Offer was a member of Company H, 30th Regiment, U. S. Colored Infantry. Reverend Offer served as Pastor of historic Emanuel A.M.E. on North Street from 1871-1877. In 2012, I had the great fortune of finding his and his wife’s headstones poking around a church graveyard on the Eastern Shore, at the conclusion of a great cemetery preservation seminar hosted by the Virginia Department of Historic Resources (DHR).

A large number of my ancestors were members of Emanuel A.M.E. Church since the 1840s, so I visited the church archives between 2010 and 2012 to learn more about them. There, I had the opportunity to talk with church historian Sara Choate Brown on numerous occasions. As in so many other cases in my research, talking with Mrs. Brown was an invaluable opportunity to learn from one of the elders in our community, griots and archivists that are often the last repositories of important history. In discussing Lincolnsville, she often spoke about remembering the days when Green Street “went all the way down.” I recall various ancestors that lived on Green Street in those days. My second great-grandmother, Adeline Vann Crowell (1888-1965) moved from Como, Hertford County, North Carolina to Portsmouth around 1900, and lived on Chestnut and Green Streets until her death. In the same area, another ancestor, Alfred Elmore Young (1896-1966), owned and operated a retail coal yard at 1700 Effingham, near the current location of the Portsmouth Fire Station. They are both buried in Lincoln Memorial cemetery.

Thomas Craig and family lived near the “way down” section of Green Street too. By 1875, city directories place the Craig family at the corner of Griffin and Green Streets, which is now the area bordered by Effingham Street, Bart Street, Court Street, Pavilion Drive, and Race Street, bisected by Interstate 264. The Sheriff and Co.’s Norfolk and Portsmouth City Directory for 1875-1876 listed Thomas Craig’s occupation as “mariner.”

Receiving Ship Franklin, 1914. Library of Congress

Receiving Ship Franklin, 1914. Library of Congress

Thomas Craig continued his service with the U.S. Navy, reenlisting and serving on the USS New Hampshire in 1875, the USS Worcester in 1876, and US Receiving Ship Franklin in 1877 through 1880. Throughout his career, he’d held the rank of “landsman,” given to new recruits, and “ordinary seaman,” a rank landsmen were usually promoted to after one year’s service. The lone exception was during his service aboard the USRS Franklin, when he was listed as a “jack o’ the dust.” An interesting sounding term, I learned the rank originates with the Royal Navy, and is defined as the “person in charge of breaking out provisions for the food service operation.” Nothing to do with cleaning, my first thought upon seeing the phrase. My third great-grandfather, Max Orton, also served aboard the USRS Franklin. A twenty-two year navy veteran, he first enlisted on October 27, 1880 at Norfolk, Va., and held the rank “jack o’ the dust.” I remember thinking “jack of the what?” the first time I read it while reviewing Max’s military records. Talk about six degrees of separation in genealogy. I suppose I can scratch that item off the family history to-do list!

In 1880, Thomas Craig was admitted to the Naval Hospital at Portsmouth, and diagnosed with Phthisis–pneumonica chronica, or pulmonary tuberculosis/chronic pneumonia. J. E. Gardner, P. A. Surgeon (physician’s assistant) at the Naval Hospital, noted that Thomas’ chronic illness was developed aboard the U. S. Receiving Ship Franklin, and being “exposed to the foul air and also to the dangers of overheating himself while attending to the water that was collected from the ‘exhaust’ steam which kept the hold hot and damp.” As a result of the diagnosis, Thomas was discharged from the Navy for medical reasons on June 30, 1880, after twenty-five years of service.

Due to his disability, Thomas filed for and began receiving his navy pension in 1881. Friends, neighbors, and fellow veterans, many of whom are also buried in the Mt. Calvary Cemetery Complex, were required to act as witnesses to validate his identity for the government before he could receive his pension. In the years that followed, he and his wife Mary continued to live at 1200 Green Street, with Thomas working off and on as a general laborer. Between 1888 and 1889, he worked as a lighterman, operating a small barge delivering and ferrying goods.

On February 1, 1896, Thomas Craig passed away. A copy of Thomas Craig’s death certificate was supplied by Portsmouth medical

Frank Stanley Hope

Frank Stanley Hope. Portsmouth Public Library.

officer Frank Stanley Hope (1855-1927), who is buried in Cedar Grove Cemetery. Thomas Craig’s wife, Mary, was the informant. The certificate notes that Thomas was sixty-five years old at the time of his death, and his place of birth Wilmington, Delaware. His residence is listed as 1100 Green St. (an error), and burial in Mt. Olive Cemetery. The undertaker was George Colden, with business address of 629 Pearl Street, Portsmouth. George Colden (1843-1921), from Nansemond County (now Suffolk), was one of the primary undertakers for the Mt. Calvary Cemetery Complex.

At this point, I wanted to discover more about the company that supplied Thomas’ headstone (and those of many other Civil War veterans) in Mt. Calvary Cemetery Complex. After a little research, I discovered that it was W. H. Gross, proprietor of Lee Marble Works (est. 1852), located in Lee, Massachusetts. Under contract with the U. S. Government, a section of a Department of the Interior Lime Belt Survey, published in 1923, reads:

“One of the products of the quarry is headstones for graves of soldiers in United States cemeteries. The epitaphs are cut in raised letters by attaching brass letters with roundish upper surfaces to the marble and exposing it to a sand blast long enough to remove the marble between the letters to a depth of a quarter of an inch. The sides of the letters are then sharpened with pneumatic hand tools.”

Lee Marble Works - Lee, Massachusetts

Lee Marble Works – Lee, Massachusetts (Wikipedia)

After Thomas Craig’s death, his widow, Mary, lived at 1307 Green Street with daughter Rebecca (by her first husband Stephen Drummond) and her daughter’s family: husband Enos Hodges, sons William, Owen, Charles, Elmore; and daughters Cornelia, Blanche, Minnie, Colestia, and Mary Louise. Mary Craig passed in 1910, and is also buried in Mt. Olive Cemetery. I’ve yet to find her grave site, though it’s possible she rests alongside her husband in an unmarked grave.

Other interesting tidbits found amongst Mary Craig’s records are a few receipts from notable African American businesses in Portsmouth’s history, some of which I’d never seen before in years of research. When Mary Craig became ill in late 1909, she was attended by Joseph Jabez France, M.D. (1865-1926), a native of Accra, Ghana, and a highly regarded doctor in Portsmouth’s African American community. Dr. France’s office was located at 803 Glasgow Street. The Craig family also required the services of Dr. Eugene J. Bass (1866-1944), a pioneering businessman and druggist whose pharmacy was located on the corner of Green and London Streets. Dr. Joseph J. France and family are buried in Mt. Calvary Cemetery, and Dr. Eugene J. Bass is buried in Lincoln Memorial cemetery.

Joseph J. France, Eugene J. Bass Advertisements. New Journal and Guide

Joseph J. France, Eugene J. Bass business receipts. Portsmouth, 1910

The information that one can discover from a headstone! What I’ve learned from the study of Thomas Craig’s life is amazing, and in a surprising way. I “met” him in a search for family and ancestry, in honoring the last wish of an elder. In a personal journey through history, I encountered a stranger, one whose story came to mirror the lives of some of my ancestors, with similar life experiences that were marked by racism, discrimination, hardship, struggle, and triumph. Their story is a Portsmouth story, an American story, part of our collective history, speaking to us from stones weathered by time. However, these stories in the stones may be lost. The cemeteries where they rest are threatened every day by the history of neglect, vandalism, flooding, overgrowth, and more recently, by gentrification and commercial development. Thomas Craig’s headstone, which taught me so much about his life, family, and 19th century African American life in Delaware, is sinking into the ground. Some of my ancestors’ gravestones have been vandalized. Thanks in part to these stones, and the cemeteries where they rest, I’ve been able to reconstruct a family legacy that spans over three hundred years. What other stories do the cemeteries contain? How much of our history remains to be rediscovered? As indicated on my website, I’ve visited many cemeteries in the last seven years, and continue to see the systemic blight of these important institutions that often matches the conditions of the surrounding neighborhoods. As the communities deteriorate or disappear because of the lack of jobs, resources, or the impact of commercial development, this fragile but important history may be lost to future generations. Genealogists and historians like me feel a sense of urgency to reclaim and preserve this history. These places matter, and merit our respect and protection. I hope to honor my ancestors and those of many others by working to place the Mt. Calvary Cemetery Complex on the National Register of Historic Places. In the coming months, I will continue to tell the stories of the many family legacies I find interred in these sites, following the trail illuminated by genealogical records, and incorporating the oral histories imparted by elders and members of the community. The ancestors are speaking, and I’m listening.

Sources

Reidy, Joseph P. “Black Men in Navy Blue During the Civil War. Prologue Magazine. 33.3 (2001). National Archives and Records Administration. Web. 15 Jan. 2014

Marriage records, Portsmouth Circuit Court, Portsmouth, Virginia.

U. S. City Directories, 1821-1989. Ancestry.com.

Dalleo Peter T. “The Growth of Delaware’s Antebellum Free African American Community. University of Delaware. Web. 8 Jan. 2014.

Knight Rebecca. “Hundreds In Delaware.” University of Delaware Library. Web. 10 Jan. 2014

Thomas Craig Pension File. National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, D.C.

U. S. Federal Census Records, Ancestry.com

Jordan, Winthrop D. White Over Black: American Attitudes toward the Negro, 1550-1812. Chapel Hill: Published for the Institute of Early American History and Culture at Williamsburg, Va., by the University of North Carolina, 1968. Print.

“Terms, Traditions and Customs of the Naval Service.” Bluejacket.com. Web. 8 Dec. 2013

Dale, T. Nelson. The Lime Belt of Massachusetts and Parts of Eastern New York and Western Connecticut. Washington D. C.: Government Printing Office, 1923.

15 Comments

Filed under Delaware, Lincolnsville, Norfolk County, North Carolina, Stories in Stone, USCT Diaries, Virginia