Tag Archives: NC

Memorials to United States Colored Troops: Pt. 1 – New Hanover County, North Carolina

Memorials to United States Colored Troops

A photo-essay series dedicated to the United States Colored Troops, and how they were remembered in contemporary news media

Pt. 1

New Hanover County, North Carolina

Wilmington National Cemetery, Pine Forest Cemetery

 

Pvt Geoge Berden Wilmington ND Copyright Nadia Orton 2014

Pvt. George Berden, Co D. 37th Regiment, U. S. Colored Infantry – Wilmington National Cemetery, Wilmington, NC

 

“George E. Berden, the well known proprietor of a colored boarding house on North Water street, was found dead on the floor of his room yesterday morning, between 10 and 11 o’clock. Deceased had been under the treatment of a physician for the last ten years, but during the most of the time has been able to attend to his business. Wednesday night he was at a meeting of the J. C. Abbott Post No. 15, G. A. R., and was installed as quartermaster. He complained of feeling a little unwell and said he hoped the ceremonies of installation would be gotten through with as soon as possible. Being up so late the night previous, it was expected that he would sleep late yesterday morning, and it was not until the hour named that some one went to call him and found him dead. He had left his bed and dressed himself before the final summons came.

Deceased will be interred at the National cemetery, permission to that end having been obtained from the Secretary of War, Berden being a discharged soldier. He as about 42 years of age, and leaves a wife.” — The Weekly Star, January 16, 1885

“Found Dead – George E. Berden, colored, who kept a sailor’s boarding house on North Water street, between Chestnut and Mulberry, was found dead in his room this morning. He had been in feeble health for a considerable time, but was not considered in a dangerous condition and his death was a surprise to all his friends. He was a member of J. C. Abbott Post, No. 15, G. A. R., and was installed as Quartermaster of the Post last night. His remains will be interred in the National Cemetery. The deceased was about 42 years of age and leaves a wife but no children.” — The Daily Review, January 8, 1885

(Photo: Nadia K. Orton, October 18, 2014)

Pvt. James Capot Wilmington NC Copyright Nadia Orton 2014

Pvt. James Capot, Co. G, 37th Regiment, U. S. Colored Infantry – Wilmington National Cemetery, Wilmington, NC

 

“James Capot, a very old colored man, who lives in Foard’s alley, between Bladen and Harnett and near Fourth street, dropped dead at his home early yesterday morning of heart disease. The police authorities were notified and they in turn notified Coroner Price, who after viewing the body deemed a coroner’s inquest unnecessary, as death resulted from natural causes.” — Wilmington Morning Star, April 2, 1899

(Photo: Nadia K. Orton, October 18, 2014)

1st Sgt. J. S. W. Eagles Wilmington NC Copyright 2014 Nadia Orton

1st Sgt. John S. W. Eagles, Co. D, 37th Regiment, U. S. Colored Infantry – Wilmington National Cemetery, Wilmington, NC

 

“J. S. W. Eagles, a well known colored man in this city, died in Wilmington yesterday morning at 3 o’clock, at the age of 57 years. The deceased was commander of John C. Abbott Post, Grand Army of the Republic, and was probably the only colored commander in the United States. During the civil war he was regularly enlisted in the federal army, and at the battle of the crater at Petersburg he received a bayonet thrust through the arm, the scar remaining for his life time.

The funeral will take place at 3 o’clock this afternoon at St. Stephen’s A. M. E. church of which the deceased was a member. The interment will be made at the National cemetery and the burial will be made in accordance with the Grand Army of the Republic ceremonies. The members of John C. Abbott Post will attend in body.” — Wilmington Messenger, July 18, 1901; Semi-Weekly Messenger, July 19, 1901

(Photo: Nadia K. Orton, October 18, 2014)

Pvt. Abram Hawkins Wilmington NC Copyright Nadia Orton 2014

Pvt. Abraham Hawkins, Co. B, 30th Regiment, U. S. Colored Infantry

 

“Abram Hankins, a colored man aged about 55 years, died yesterday morning at 3:30 o’clock, at his home on Meadow and Ninth streets. The deceased was well known here several years ago and a Republican ward politician.” – Wilmington Messenger, May 13, 1896

(Photo: Nadia K. Orton, October 18, 2014)

Cpl Franklin Howard Wilmington NC Copyright 2014 Nadia K. Orton

Cpl. Franklin Howard, Co. K, 35th Regiment, U. S. Colored Infantry – Wilmington National Cemetery, Wilmington, NC

 

“Franklin Howard respectable and well known colored man, 77 years of age, died yesterday morning at his home, Eleventh and Meadow streets, at 7 o’clock. The deceased was local minister for St. Stephens church and also a member of the J. C. Abbott Post, Grand Army of the Republic. Funeral services will be conducted tomorrow afternoon at 3 o’clock from St. Stephens church and interment will be made in Pine Forest cemetery. Friends of the deceased, both white and colored, will feel a pang of sorrow in the passing of one of the older members of the colored race.” — Wilmington Dispatch, April 25, 1918

“Franklin Howard, well-known colored man, 77 years of age, died at 7 o’clock yesterday morning at his home Eleventh and Meadow streets, mourned by his family and many friends among members of both the white and colored races. He as a local minister of St. Stephen’s church, this city, and also a member of J. C. Abbott Post, Grand Army of the Republic, Wilmington. The funeral will be conducted Friday afternoon at 3 o’clock from St. Stephen’s church and will be buried in Pine Forest cemetery.” — Wilmington Morning Star, April 25, 1918

(Photo: Nadia K. Orton, October 18, 2014)

Com Sgt George L. Mabson Wilmington NC Copyright 2015 Nadia Orton

Com. Sgt. George L. Mabson, Co. L. 5th Regiment, Mass Cav.

 

“George L. Mabson, one of the most prominent and influential colored men in this city, died at the residence of his mother, on Fifth street, between Hanover and Brunswick, at half past 10 o’clock yesterday forenoon. His disease was typho-malarial fever, with which he had been sick about three weeks. The deceased was 46 years of age, was commander of Joseph C. Abbott Post G. A. R., was a member of the colored Masonic Lodge, and otherwise a prominent man with his race. He leaves a wife and three children. The obsequies were held at St. Stephen’s A. M. E. Church at 3 o’clock this afternoon, Rev. James W. Telfair officiating. Thence the remains were conveyed to Pine Forest Cemetery for interment.” — The Daily Review, October 5, 1885

(Photo: Nadia K. Orton, May 12, 2015)

 

Musn Stephen Moore Wilmington NC Copyright 2014 Nadia K. Orton

Prin. Musn. Stephen Moore, 6th Regiment, U. S. Colored Heavy Artillery

“Died, in this city June 10th, 1893, Stephen Moore, aged 79 years, better known as Stephen Hoskins. Funeral at St. Luke’s Church Sunday, June 11th, at 4:30 o’clock p.m. Friends and relatives invited to attend.” — Wilmington Messenger, June 11, 1893

(Photo: Nadia K. Orton, October 18, 2014)

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Filed under Civil War, In Memoriam, Memorials to Civil War Veterans, New Hanover County, North Carolina, U. S. Colored Troops, USCT Diaries

A Personal Journey Through African-American Cemeteries – National Trust for Historic Preservation

Copyright Nadia Orton

At my great-great-great-grandfather Alexander Orton, 10th U. S. Colored Infantry, at Grove Baptist Church Cemetery in Portsmouth, Virginia.

I’ll never forget the exciting moment when I found the gravesite of Alexander Orton, my paternal great-great-great-grandfather. Born in 1842 in Virginia, he was a Civil War veteran and member of the 10th Regiment, U. S. Colored Infantry.

Finding his last resting place was part of a genealogy project I’ve been pursuing for nine years now, keeping a long-standing promise made to an elder. Diagnosed with a serious chronic illness as a teenager, I needed a kidney transplant soon after college. My great-aunt gathered her entire church congregation to support my transplant fund, but held a lingering concern about our family legacy.

“Do not let our history die,” she told my father shortly before her passing in 2007. To honor her last wish, I vowed to make the most of my second chance and do my part in documenting our family history.

I’ve traced my father’s ancestry to 1630 in Virginia, and my mother’s to 1770 in North Carolina. Some of my ancestors were born free, while others were enslaved. Like Alexander, some enlisted in the Union Army to fight for freedom in the Civil War. They’d founded four African-American communities in Tidewater, Virginia, along with masonic lodges, banks, churches, and schools. They were oystermen, carpenters, farmers, teachers, Pullman porters, and teamsters at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard. READ MORE

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Filed under Baltimore, Chesapeake, Civil War, Durham County, Florida, Franklin County, Gates County, Georgia, Hertford County, Isle of Wight County, Maryland, New Hanover County, Norfolk County, North Carolina, Pasquotank County, Petersburg, Portsmouth, Richmond, Slavery, South Carolina, Stories in Stone, Suffolk, Tombstone Tales, U. S. Colored Troops, Vance County, Virginia, Warren County, Wilmington

Surry County, Virginia: The slave and tenant house at Bacon’s Castle

Slave/tenant house at Bacons Castle, Surry County, October 6, 2012

Slave/tenant house at Bacon’s Castle, Surry County, October 6, 2012

 

Photos of the slave and tenant house at Bacon’s Castle (ca. 1665). We had the opportunity to visit during an event a few years ago. I’d suffered a bilateral lower leg fracture some months prior, so those present would remember my fashionable orthopedic boot. Physical discomfort aside, it was an amazing experience. There were a few descendants of slaves and former tenant workers present. One descendant, Lucy, recounted memories of growing up at Bacon’s Castle. Her family had once lived in a similar structure, and she could vividly remember the sound of the rain on the building’s tin roof. It’s in these stories that history becomes a tangible thing, and connects with our present day.

A historical wayside marker in front of the house reads:

This building was first constructed in 1829 by the Cocke family, descendants of Arthur Allen. There was a single entry door and a porch. In 1834 there were eighty slaves working on the property, some of whom were probably housed in this building. The Hankins family, who owned the property during the Civil War, added an addition and possibly removed the porch in 1849. The floor plan today matches what would have been present in the late 1800s.

In the 1940s, several families were still living on the Bacon’s Castle property. The slave house was wired for electricity and a small kitchen added to the back of the building. Although three or four enslaved families would have lived here prior to the Civil War, the interior was modified to accommodate only one or two tenants after the war. The kitchen addition was removed in the 1990s, returning the building to its antebellum appearance.

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Bacons castle slave/tenant dwelling, 2012 Orton

 

Bacon's Castle Historical Marker, Colonial Trial, Surry. June 9, 2012

Bacon’s Castle historical marker, Colonial Trial, Surry County, Virginia. June 9, 2012

 

 

 

 

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Filed under Chesapeake, Civil War, Slavery, Surry County, The Descendants Corner, U. S. Colored Troops, Virginia

Warren County, North Carolina: Exploring an old Rosenwald School

Warren County NC Rosenwald Orton

A view of an old Rosenwald School, Warren County, North Carolina

Exploring an old Rosenwald School in Warren County, North Carolina. Our 83-year old guide, a former student of the school, is a newfound maternal cousin. We’re related through the same set of great-grandparents, my great-great-great-great grandparents, and his great-great-great grandparents, who are buried in a slave cemetery we visited last year. ♥

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Filed under North Carolina, Slavery, Warren County

Protected: Portsmouth, Virginia: The Leon A. Turner Family and interconnections, Mt. Olive Cemetery

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Filed under Anne Arundel County, Brunswick County, Delaware, Maryland, New Hanover County, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Portsmouth, Prince George County, Slavery, Stories in Stone, U. S. Colored Troops, Virginia, Wilmington

North Carolina: Hidden gravestones in the Lower Cape Fear

Lower Cape Fear Cemetery

Hidden gravestones in the Lower Cape Fear

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February 20, 2016 · 8:30 pm

Franklin County, North Carolina: Haywood Baptist Church Cemetery

Haywood Baptist Louisburg NC Orton 2016

Haywood Baptist Church Cemetery, Ingleside, Franklin County, NC

Looking for great-great-grandfather’s grave site. In the foreground are several yucca plants.

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February 5, 2016 · 8:02 pm

Pasquotank County, NC: The Moore Family Cemetery

Moore Cemetery Pasquotank NC Orton

Moore Cemetery, Elizabeth City, Pasquotank County, North Carolina

On a recent road trip down Route 158, in Pasquotank County, North Carolina, I spotted a small family cemetery.  I was on the way to Durham, North Carolina, to attend a commemoration for George Henry White (1852-1918), a nineteenth century officeholder and civil rights advocate. At first, I noticed the trash, beer cans and other detritus along the roadway, discarded by careless passersby. But then I noticed what appeared to be a granite headstone, peeking through a bed of ivy and other types of overgrowth. Was that what I thought it was? Right by the road, so close? I’d wanted to inspect it immediately, but the long line of irritated-looking drivers behind us nixed the opportunity. I wrote down the nearest cross street (Blindman Road), and vowed to revisit the cemetery on the way back home.

Anyone who chronicles burial grounds is probably used to seeing these sites on road trips. Marked by their relative small size, they’re common in rural areas, and hearken back to the era when ancestors were buried on family homesteads and estates. At times, the gravestones and other markers that signal sacred ground stand out, due to their height and prominence, whether located next to gas stations and convenience stores, in the middle of grain fields, or in modern homeowners’ front yards. In other cases, the graves may be unmarked, or have flat, worn, or hard to read headstones shrouded in overgrowth, surrounded by grazing cows and horses.

During our frequent travels, my family’s used to me pointing these cemeteries out, and groans ensue. “Another one?” they may say. Well, yes, of course. These sites are everywhere. My folks made me the history nut that I am, instilling in me a love of books, museums, and all things historical from a young age. So it’s an understandable development, I think, being drawn to spaces of tangible family history. After all, it’s the type of curiosity that helped me find my own ancestral roots, a line that stretches back to 1600s, Tidewater, Virginia. But my family has accommodated me on these unplanned stops so many times I’m sympathetic to the groans. To a point, that is. The desire to see the cemeteries remains, and when we do stop to read the names on the stones, I’m fortunate to discover clues that may lead to interesting nuggets of local history.

Making good on the original promise, we returned to the family cemetery on US- 158 this past Sunday. We’d spent the better part of the day taking the road less traveled from Durham, winding along various state routes through Franklin, Warren, Halifax, Northampton, and Gates counties, North Carolina, the geography of my mother’s ancestry. Eventually, the GPS on my Android sounded a reminder. Blindman Road was coming up. It was time to look for the roadside cemetery.

Checking the rear view, no one was behind us, so we were able to slow down and find it. The cemetery is located across the street from a recycling company, and as there’s no dedicated parking, we pulled onto the shoulder of the road. Walking up to the cemetery, I proceeded with caution. It was a really warm day, and there might’ve been critters about (the kind with fangs).

The cemetery seemed to contain only two modern-looking headstones. There may be depressions indicative of sunken graves on the site, but the existing bed of leaves and ivy made it impossible to tell. The nearest, visible gravestone, the one I’d spotted from the road days before, read “Mother Hattie M. Moore.”

Hattie Moore Gravestone Orton Elizabeth City NC

Gravestone of Hattie Moore (1917-1954).

For a lazy Sunday afternoon, US-158 was a very busy thoroughfare, spurts of traffic passing by at over 50 mph. With only a ditch between myself and the road, I was aware of every single vehicle.

Traffic passing Moore Cemetery Elizabeth City NC Orton

Traffic passing Moore Cemetery on US-158. January 31, 2016

I zoomed in on the second stone from a distance; there was far too much leaf and ivy ground cover to get any closer. Rattlesnake territory, I thought. There was no way this stone would receive a full inspection, but I could make out the inscription, “Father.”

Curtis J Moore Grave Elizabeth City NC Orton

Gravestone of Curtis Jarvis Moore, Sr. (1915-1971).

At one point, I heard a truck approaching, and for safety reasons, paused till it lumbered past.

Truck passing Moore Cemetery Orton

Truck passing Moore Cemetery, January 31, 2016. Elizabeth City, NC

I couldn’t get over how close this hallowed ground is to a major roadway. Thinking about how many times we’d zipped past this little cemetery on family genealogy trips, I took a few more pics for good measure, being sure to keep my distance. Then I decided it was time to go. I’d seen this:

Is that a snake I see?

Is that a rattlesnake I see?

It looked like a canebrake rattlesnake, and where there’s one, there could be more. I quickly realized the grave site of Curtis Jarvis Moore, Sr. may have been host to a little snake den. Yep, definitely time to go home.

Later that evening, I reviewed a few documents that provided some information about the burial ground. Known as the Moore Cemetery, the only documented burials are Curtis Jarvis Moore, Sr. (1915-1971), and Hattie M. Moore (1917-1954). Curtis and Hattie were married on May 13, 1939, in Pasquotank County, by Rev. Monroe Ramsey Lane (1856-1943), whose brother-in-law is buried in Portsmouth, Virginia’s Lincoln Memorial Cemetery. Curtis J. Moore, Sr. was the son of John Lee Moore and Edna Hunter, the grandson of Axum J. Moore and Katie Ann “Kitty” Stewart, and the great-grandson of Isaac and Louisa Moore.

Marriage certificate of Axum J. Moore and Katie Ann Stewart. Pasquotank County, 1881. Ancestry.com

Marriage certificate of Axum J. Moore and Katie Ann Stewart. Pasquotank County, 1881. Ancestry.com

Hattie M. Moore’s death certificate states her maiden name was “Varn,” born in Pasquotank County, the daughter of John Varn and Mary Pernell. However, the marriage certificate states Hattie M. Moore was a Freeman, originally from Bertie County, North Carolina, and the daughter of John Freeman and Melvina (Melvinia) Freeman. The couple lived in the Newland district, in the northern section of Pasquotank County. I’m not sure when family last visited the cemetery. A hopeful sign are the flowers that, while faded, have been carefully placed beside both headstones.The cemetery has been added to Find-a-Grave, and is also included in a county cemetery database which can be found here.

The next time you’re on the road, keep your eyes peeled. You never know what genealogical treasures may be found along the roadways of Tidewater. And watch for snakes.

 

 

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Filed under Durham County, Franklin County, Gates County, Halifax County, North Carolina, Pasquotank County, Portsmouth, Tombstone Tales, Virginia, Warren County

The Descendants Corner: Update – John Hodges, Civil War Sailor, Mt. Olive Cemetery

John Hodges, USN

John Hodges, USN

The replacement gravestone for Landsman John Hodges was installed in Mt. Olive Cemetery, Portsmouth, Virginia, on December 30, 2015. We received the news from his descendant, Vivian Nicholson. John Hodges (1819-1885) served aboard the USS Lenapee during the Civil War, enlisting on April 22, 1864, and was the grandfather of Portsmouth native William Henry Nicholson, the first African American hired by the New York City Fire Department (FDNY). Vivian shared William’s story with us in a guest blog, which can be read here.

 

A picture of the old gravestone.

A picture of the old gravestone.

 

Landsman John Hodges (1819-1885), Mt. Olive Cemetery

Landsman John Hodges (1819-1885), Mt. Olive Cemetery

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Filed under Civil War, North Carolina, Portsmouth, The Descendants Corner, Tombstone Tales, U. S. Colored Troops, USCT Diaries, Virginia

Charlotte, NC: Veterans Day at Pinewood Cemetery (1853)

Pinewood Cemetery Charlotte Orton

Pinewood Cemetery, established 1853 for African-Americans by the City of Charlotte, North Carolina

William Moore Pinewood Orton

Gravestone of William C. Moore

The inscription: “William C. Moore, U. S. Navy. Died Nov. 30, 1909, Age 35 Years. Gone Home.”


Lt. Col. C. S. L. A. Taylor Pinewood Orton

Gravestone of Lt. Col. Charles S. L. A. Taylor

Lt. Col. C. S. L. A. Taylor, 3rd North Carolina Volunteers

Lt. Col. C. S. L. A. Taylor, 3rd North Carolina Volunteers

Lt. Col. Charles S. L. A. Taylor. From the book, Black America: Charlotte, North Carolina: “The finely attired gentleman seen in this studio portrait is Col. C. S. L. A. Taylor. He was one of the first black colonels in the U. S. Army, and served in the Spanish-American War. Colonel Taylor operated the National Barber Shop at 19 North College Street, and represented Third Ward as an alderman, elected in 1885.” (Photo and text, Vermelle Diamond Ely, Grace Hoey Drain, and Amy Rogers. Black America Series: Charlotte, North Carolina. Charleston, SC: Arcadia Publishing, 2001, p. 11).

Lt. Col. Charles S. L. A. Taylor died on November 17, 1934, and is buried next to his wife Ella, and daughter Louisa T. Johnson.


Former segregation fence Pinewood-Elmwood Cemetery Charlotte Orton

The former barrier between Pinewood and Elmwood Cemeteries, Charlotte

Instead of the infamous fence, erected in the 1930s, trees now line the center aisle between the the drives of Pinewood Cemetery, on the left, and Elmwood Cemetery, to the right. Elmwood Cemetery was established in 1853 by the City of Charlotte, North Carolina, with Pinewood Cemetery as a subsection, set aside exclusively for African-American burials. Visiting the cemetery today, it was sobering to remember that all of the veterans and their family members were once on the “other side of the fence.” It was finally removed in the late 1960s, due to the influence of the national Civil Rights Movement, and local efforts of City Councilman Fred Alexander and the larger African-American community of Charlotte, North Carolina.


Emanuel Snowden Pinewood Orton

Pvt. Emanuel Snowden, Co A, 3rd NC Volunteers

Pvt. Emanuel Snowden was the son of Alfred and Eliza Snowden. He was born sometime during the 1860s, the exact date difficult to pinpoint due to varying discrepancies in census, marriage, and death records. Throughout most of his life, he was identified as a painter by occupation, and lived in Charlotte’s Second Ward. He passed on October 11, 1936, and the informant was Bessie Wilson, Emanuel’s sister.


Pinewood Cemetery Charlotte Nadia Orton

Pinewood Cemetery, Charlotte NC

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Filed under Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, Stories in Stone, Tombstone Tales