Tag Archives: New Hanover County

Memorials to United States Colored Troops: Pt. 1 – New Hanover County, North Carolina

Memorials to United States Colored Troops

A photo-essay series dedicated to the United States Colored Troops, and how they were remembered in contemporary news media

Pt. 1

New Hanover County, North Carolina

Wilmington National Cemetery, Pine Forest Cemetery

 

Pvt Geoge Berden Wilmington ND Copyright Nadia Orton 2014

Pvt. George Berden, Co D. 37th Regiment, U. S. Colored Infantry – Wilmington National Cemetery, Wilmington, NC

 

“George E. Berden, the well known proprietor of a colored boarding house on North Water street, was found dead on the floor of his room yesterday morning, between 10 and 11 o’clock. Deceased had been under the treatment of a physician for the last ten years, but during the most of the time has been able to attend to his business. Wednesday night he was at a meeting of the J. C. Abbott Post No. 15, G. A. R., and was installed as quartermaster. He complained of feeling a little unwell and said he hoped the ceremonies of installation would be gotten through with as soon as possible. Being up so late the night previous, it was expected that he would sleep late yesterday morning, and it was not until the hour named that some one went to call him and found him dead. He had left his bed and dressed himself before the final summons came.

Deceased will be interred at the National cemetery, permission to that end having been obtained from the Secretary of War, Berden being a discharged soldier. He as about 42 years of age, and leaves a wife.” — The Weekly Star, January 16, 1885

“Found Dead – George E. Berden, colored, who kept a sailor’s boarding house on North Water street, between Chestnut and Mulberry, was found dead in his room this morning. He had been in feeble health for a considerable time, but was not considered in a dangerous condition and his death was a surprise to all his friends. He was a member of J. C. Abbott Post, No. 15, G. A. R., and was installed as Quartermaster of the Post last night. His remains will be interred in the National Cemetery. The deceased was about 42 years of age and leaves a wife but no children.” — The Daily Review, January 8, 1885

(Photo: Nadia K. Orton, October 18, 2014)

Pvt. James Capot Wilmington NC Copyright Nadia Orton 2014

Pvt. James Capot, Co. G, 37th Regiment, U. S. Colored Infantry – Wilmington National Cemetery, Wilmington, NC

 

“James Capot, a very old colored man, who lives in Foard’s alley, between Bladen and Harnett and near Fourth street, dropped dead at his home early yesterday morning of heart disease. The police authorities were notified and they in turn notified Coroner Price, who after viewing the body deemed a coroner’s inquest unnecessary, as death resulted from natural causes.” — Wilmington Morning Star, April 2, 1899

(Photo: Nadia K. Orton, October 18, 2014)

1st Sgt. J. S. W. Eagles Wilmington NC Copyright 2014 Nadia Orton

1st Sgt. John S. W. Eagles, Co. D, 37th Regiment, U. S. Colored Infantry – Wilmington National Cemetery, Wilmington, NC

 

“J. S. W. Eagles, a well known colored man in this city, died in Wilmington yesterday morning at 3 o’clock, at the age of 57 years. The deceased was commander of John C. Abbott Post, Grand Army of the Republic, and was probably the only colored commander in the United States. During the civil war he was regularly enlisted in the federal army, and at the battle of the crater at Petersburg he received a bayonet thrust through the arm, the scar remaining for his life time.

The funeral will take place at 3 o’clock this afternoon at St. Stephen’s A. M. E. church of which the deceased was a member. The interment will be made at the National cemetery and the burial will be made in accordance with the Grand Army of the Republic ceremonies. The members of John C. Abbott Post will attend in body.” — Wilmington Messenger, July 18, 1901; Semi-Weekly Messenger, July 19, 1901

(Photo: Nadia K. Orton, October 18, 2014)

Pvt. Abram Hawkins Wilmington NC Copyright Nadia Orton 2014

Pvt. Abraham Hawkins, Co. B, 30th Regiment, U. S. Colored Infantry

 

“Abram Hankins, a colored man aged about 55 years, died yesterday morning at 3:30 o’clock, at his home on Meadow and Ninth streets. The deceased was well known here several years ago and a Republican ward politician.” – Wilmington Messenger, May 13, 1896

(Photo: Nadia K. Orton, October 18, 2014)

Cpl Franklin Howard Wilmington NC Copyright 2014 Nadia K. Orton

Cpl. Franklin Howard, Co. K, 35th Regiment, U. S. Colored Infantry – Wilmington National Cemetery, Wilmington, NC

 

“Franklin Howard respectable and well known colored man, 77 years of age, died yesterday morning at his home, Eleventh and Meadow streets, at 7 o’clock. The deceased was local minister for St. Stephens church and also a member of the J. C. Abbott Post, Grand Army of the Republic. Funeral services will be conducted tomorrow afternoon at 3 o’clock from St. Stephens church and interment will be made in Pine Forest cemetery. Friends of the deceased, both white and colored, will feel a pang of sorrow in the passing of one of the older members of the colored race.” — Wilmington Dispatch, April 25, 1918

“Franklin Howard, well-known colored man, 77 years of age, died at 7 o’clock yesterday morning at his home Eleventh and Meadow streets, mourned by his family and many friends among members of both the white and colored races. He as a local minister of St. Stephen’s church, this city, and also a member of J. C. Abbott Post, Grand Army of the Republic, Wilmington. The funeral will be conducted Friday afternoon at 3 o’clock from St. Stephen’s church and will be buried in Pine Forest cemetery.” — Wilmington Morning Star, April 25, 1918

(Photo: Nadia K. Orton, October 18, 2014)

Com Sgt George L. Mabson Wilmington NC Copyright 2015 Nadia Orton

Com. Sgt. George L. Mabson, Co. L. 5th Regiment, Mass Cav.

 

“George L. Mabson, one of the most prominent and influential colored men in this city, died at the residence of his mother, on Fifth street, between Hanover and Brunswick, at half past 10 o’clock yesterday forenoon. His disease was typho-malarial fever, with which he had been sick about three weeks. The deceased was 46 years of age, was commander of Joseph C. Abbott Post G. A. R., was a member of the colored Masonic Lodge, and otherwise a prominent man with his race. He leaves a wife and three children. The obsequies were held at St. Stephen’s A. M. E. Church at 3 o’clock this afternoon, Rev. James W. Telfair officiating. Thence the remains were conveyed to Pine Forest Cemetery for interment.” — The Daily Review, October 5, 1885

(Photo: Nadia K. Orton, May 12, 2015)

 

Musn Stephen Moore Wilmington NC Copyright 2014 Nadia K. Orton

Prin. Musn. Stephen Moore, 6th Regiment, U. S. Colored Heavy Artillery

“Died, in this city June 10th, 1893, Stephen Moore, aged 79 years, better known as Stephen Hoskins. Funeral at St. Luke’s Church Sunday, June 11th, at 4:30 o’clock p.m. Friends and relatives invited to attend.” — Wilmington Messenger, June 11, 1893

(Photo: Nadia K. Orton, October 18, 2014)

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Filed under Civil War, In Memoriam, Memorials to Civil War Veterans, New Hanover County, North Carolina, U. S. Colored Troops, USCT Diaries

A Personal Journey Through African-American Cemeteries – National Trust for Historic Preservation

Copyright Nadia Orton

At my great-great-great-grandfather Alexander Orton, 10th U. S. Colored Infantry, at Grove Baptist Church Cemetery in Portsmouth, Virginia.

I’ll never forget the exciting moment when I found the gravesite of Alexander Orton, my paternal great-great-great-grandfather. Born in 1842 in Virginia, he was a Civil War veteran and member of the 10th Regiment, U. S. Colored Infantry.

Finding his last resting place was part of a genealogy project I’ve been pursuing for nine years now, keeping a long-standing promise made to an elder. Diagnosed with a serious chronic illness as a teenager, I needed a kidney transplant soon after college. My great-aunt gathered her entire church congregation to support my transplant fund, but held a lingering concern about our family legacy.

“Do not let our history die,” she told my father shortly before her passing in 2007. To honor her last wish, I vowed to make the most of my second chance and do my part in documenting our family history.

I’ve traced my father’s ancestry to 1630 in Virginia, and my mother’s to 1770 in North Carolina. Some of my ancestors were born free, while others were enslaved. Like Alexander, some enlisted in the Union Army to fight for freedom in the Civil War. They’d founded four African-American communities in Tidewater, Virginia, along with masonic lodges, banks, churches, and schools. They were oystermen, carpenters, farmers, teachers, Pullman porters, and teamsters at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard. READ MORE

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Filed under Baltimore, Chesapeake, Civil War, Durham County, Florida, Franklin County, Gates County, Georgia, Hertford County, Isle of Wight County, Maryland, New Hanover County, Norfolk County, North Carolina, Pasquotank County, Petersburg, Portsmouth, Richmond, Slavery, South Carolina, Stories in Stone, Suffolk, Tombstone Tales, U. S. Colored Troops, Vance County, Virginia, Warren County, Wilmington

Recovering and Preserving African American Cemeteries – Preservation Leadership Forum, National Trust for Historic Preservation

Pinewood Cemetery COPYRIGHT Nadia Orton

Pine Forest Cemetery, Wilmington, North Carolina

The reverence attached to cemeteries and burial grounds, which have long been considered sacred sites, is an example of enduring Africanisms and cultural tradition in the African American community. Burial grounds have always been regarded as places where ancestors could be properly honored and provided with the dignity, care, and respect in death that had often been denied them in life.

Interest in the study of my family tree has led me to over a dozen cemeteries throughout Tidewater Virginia and North Carolina, and helped reconstruct a family legacy spanning over 400 years. Cemeteries offer an important, tangible connection to history allowing closer interpretation of days past than most other sources can. Genealogists and family historians have long recognized the benefit of cemeteries in the study of family history and an increasing popular interest in genealogy has led to an increased focus on them.  READ MORE

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Filed under Civil War, Georgia, New Hanover County, North Carolina, Portsmouth, Richmond, Virginia, Wilmington

Protected: Portsmouth, Virginia: The Leon A. Turner Family and interconnections, Mt. Olive Cemetery

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Filed under Anne Arundel County, Brunswick County, Delaware, Maryland, New Hanover County, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Portsmouth, Prince George County, Slavery, Stories in Stone, U. S. Colored Troops, Virginia, Wilmington

North Carolina: Hidden gravestones in the Lower Cape Fear

Lower Cape Fear Cemetery

Hidden gravestones in the Lower Cape Fear

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February 20, 2016 · 8:30 pm

Protected: Richmond, Virginia: Thoughts on Shockoe Bottom

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Filed under Bertie County, Chesapeake, Civil War, Gates County, Hampton, Norfolk, North Carolina, Portsmouth, Richmond, Southampton County, Suffolk, Surry County, Tombstone Tales, U. S. Colored Troops, USCT Diaries, Virginia, Virginia Beach